Tuesday roundup

roundup

Looking back over the week that was, and sharing  a collection of stuff that grabbed my attention – usually focused on branding, behaviour change, strategy and creative.

1. Distracted driving

A very smart idea, perfectly executed. I love how it makes the invisible visible. It’s also using the power of social norms to change behaviour. While it’s showing that this behaviour is far more common than people might imagine, it’s also reinforcing the fact that the majority of people aren’t doing these things. The takeaway – if you are someone who texts, talks on the phone etc, you’re part of a dangerous minority.

2. Call a random Swede

A client who is being rewarded for embracing a genius idea.

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3. Tackling obesity

When it comes to healthy eating and nutrition, food labelling can play an important role. Unfortunately it’s an area where there’s a distinct lack of clarity, and, let’s be honest, an embracing of confusion. Of course, people are free to eat what they want, but that choice should be an informed one. And labelling can help. So the idea that resurfaced last week of using exercise comparisons to help people translate the impact of calories would be a wonderful initiative. It’s been talked about before – I wrote about it a few years back. Let’s hope we can start employing simplicity and smart design to make it easier for people to make healthy choices.

4. Sports Talk Radio and men

I stumbled upon this fascinating little podcast via the CBC’s Podcast Playlist. The good, but mostly problematic side of the industry.

5. Good design and healthcare

A great little episode via CBC Spark on how we can make healtthcare more human.

6. Remembering Zaha Hadid

Vitra Fire Station – 1994. Zaha Hadid’s first built project

Zaha Hadid was an inspiring and creative force in architecture. I was lucky enough to visit the Vitra Design Campus last year. While there, we did a tour of the Vitra Fire Station that she designed in 1991 – a remarkable building. In this story from The Guardian, architects speak out about her success and the sexism that she confronted.

7. You’re alive. Do you remember?

And from Germany, this wonderful campaign for Hornbach. Refreshing, unique, hilarious, and inspiring. They’ve got to the emotional core of what it means to build and create something yourself. To Do-It-yourself.

8. Words I hate

It’s not enough that we have to endure the word disruption in countless presentations and talks from so called Futurists, trendspotters and the like – as if it’s something new. Now we get to enjoy fancy acronyms.

Shrinking the change

This is perhaps one of the best and simplest description of how to achieve effective behaviour change through social marketing. In my work with many health promotion organizations and brands, it reflects an overall philosophy that is about reducing the barriers to change, and using genuine insights about how people think and act.

As laid out beautifully in this little story, three simple steps are needed:

1. you need to show people the path. What’s the end goal that they need to reach

2. you need to motivate people to want to take the journey toward change

3. And most importantly, you need to remove the barriers to change

Without tackling all these in parallel, successful change becomes less likely. These three steps work together in careful harmony, yet many organizations sometimes struggle to see how they work together. Often this can result in an over-emphasis on awareness building, or alternatively, an over-emphasis on tactics.

Ultimately you need to appeal to people’s emotions, and then work hard to remove the barriers along the way. One without the other dramatically reduces your chances of long term success

Feel first

As always, people need to feel first before they’ll do something. Emotion first, action second.

When you take the time to understand what makes people tick, find a genuine connection to your brand/ organization or stand for something bigger than yourself, you’re halfway there. Here’s a few stand-out examples.

Lurpak – a simple brand of butter became the champion of good food

Omega Co-Axial Chronometer – took my breath away the first time I saw it

Bald Cartoons – proof that truly creative ideas matter, with the power to help make the world a little better

HBO GO – the perfect demonstration of why a truly great insight makes the difference

The world’s toughest job

Save the Children – not your typical “one second a day” video

Waitrose – the story of a boy and his carrot

Three – ending on a happy note, the sillyness of the internet captured through the freedom of a spring ride on a bike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Top 9 Sunday Reads – #11

It’s been a while, but here’s a few stories, ideas and links that have grabbed my attention over the last little while

1. A great little nudge that could help change behaviour by changing habits. Called Car Mode, it’s a brilliantly simple concept that I hope Apple will embrace and make happen.

2. A lovely idea from Ikea and their agency (SMFB) in Oslo. The “Built to Last” campaign helps to overcome the perception that their furniture is tasteful but cheap, while also communicating a positive sustainability message.

3. A bit of fun from Ellen in honour of The Great American Smokeout.

4. A new series of  blog posts from The Guardian on the science behind behaviour change. Via the Guardian Sustainable Business division

5. A beautifully illustrated version of the Terry Gross interview with Maurice Sendak not long before his death.

 

6. This is a short but wonderful article again from The Guardian about the importance of harnessing passion and emotion, and driving it toward action. Life will always get in the way, so we must always help people navigate through the day to day challenges they face, and make the desired behaviour as easy as possible. We must shrink the change at all costs.

7. Wonderful video by GoldieBlox that is popping up on news feeds everywhere. They make engineering toys for girls.

 

8. A random bit of brilliance from Banksy that packs a punch – Sirens of the Lambs

 

9. More great storytelling from Google – as always, a reminder of the irresistible power of a good story.

Apple and social norms

Apple provides a simple lesson in the power of social proof. Coming under increasing competition from competitors like Android, they are celebrating a core strength of their brand. Here they remind us that “every day, more photos are taken with the iPhone then any other camera”. Not just phones, but any other camera. That simple statement grounded in fact is incredibly persuasive. We’re influenced by what we think everyone else is doing – so if you already have an iPhone, you feel rewarded. And if you don’t, you can’t help but wonder why. It’s human nature to want to do what everyone else is doing (even though we don’t like to admit it).

Health promoters and social marketers could do well to consider more opportunities to leverage the power of social norms in their communication strategies. For example, if only more people (e.g. students) knew that binge drinking was not the norm at their university – imagine the good that could come from it.