Shrinking the change

This is perhaps one of the best and simplest description of how to achieve effective behaviour change through social marketing. In my work with many health promotion organizations and brands, it reflects an overall philosophy that is about reducing the barriers to change, and using genuine insights about how people think and act.

As laid out beautifully in this little story, three simple steps are needed:

1. you need to show people the path. What’s the end goal that they need to reach

2. you need to motivate people to want to take the journey toward change

3. And most importantly, you need to remove the barriers to change

Without tackling all these in parallel, successful change becomes less likely. These three steps work together in careful harmony, yet many organizations sometimes struggle to see how they work together. Often this can result in an over-emphasis on awareness building, or alternatively, an over-emphasis on tactics.

Ultimately you need to appeal to people’s emotions, and then work hard to remove the barriers along the way. One without the other dramatically reduces your chances of long term success

Feel first

As always, people need to feel first before they’ll do something. Emotion first, action second.

When you take the time to understand what makes people tick, find a genuine connection to your brand/ organization or stand for something bigger than yourself, you’re halfway there. Here’s a few stand-out examples.

Lurpak – a simple brand of butter became the champion of good food

Omega Co-Axial Chronometer – took my breath away the first time I saw it

Bald Cartoons – proof that truly creative ideas matter, with the power to help make the world a little better

HBO GO – the perfect demonstration of why a truly great insight makes the difference

The world’s toughest job

Save the Children – not your typical “one second a day” video

Waitrose – the story of a boy and his carrot

Three – ending on a happy note, the sillyness of the internet captured through the freedom of a spring ride on a bike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Top #8 Sunday Reads – #12

Sharing a few bits and pieces from the last week;

1. Great write-up on the so called Ministry of Nudges in the UK via the New York times

At the core of nudging is the belief that people do not always act in their own self-interest. We can be undone by anxiety and swayed by our desire to fit in. We have biases and habits, and we can be lazy: Faced with a choice, we are more likely than not to go with a default option, be that a mobile ringtone or a pension plan.

2. Another reminder via the Economist of the power of emotion in advertising – in part inspired by the thinking of Daniel Kahneman, a champion psychologist.

3. Here’s an elegant way to define the power of behavioural economics – by defining what it’s not – via Ideas42

4. A beautiful film that communicates the message of sustainability – Work Wear, by Patagonia

5. Great series & partnership between W+K and D&AD. Called I wish I’d done that, it features some the best in advertising and design talking about work they wish they’d done. In this example from W+K, founder Dan Wieden shares a wonderful idea focused on shifting cultural attitudes toward climate change.

6. A beautiful and respectful film to help build awareness for the International Day of Persons with Disabilities – “Because who is perfect?”. Created for Pro Infirmis, an organization for the disabled, the idea is original and confronting yet thought provoking.

7. In this lovely idea by the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, “touch tours” are being offered for visitors who are blind and visually-impaired.

8. A perhaps my favourite video of the past few weeks. The folks at RSA created a charming and inspiring animation of a talk by Brené Brown in which she describes the difference between empathy and sympathy. Via the always brilliant Brain Pickings